DerekMorr

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Can someone with a Bionic and LTE coverage please check if the device supports IPv6? Try going to ipv6.google.com or ipv6.cnn.com. I'd appreciate it.

The T-Bolt and Revolution have v6 enabled, but Samsung disabled it on the Droid Charge.
 

bigguy_132

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If you were on 3G IPv6 does not work that is still currently IPv4. Verizon's 4G is IPv6. Could have had a brief second where it didnt work because of that.
 

Cory Streater

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Imagine this:

You're responsible for assigning names to 50 Android's. You decide it would be easiest if you standardized on 4 letter names. For example: Dick.

Not a big deal. There are plenty of 4 letter names right?

What you didn't realize is that some day the population of Android's would scale well beyond the original 50 and that you would eventually run out of 4 letter names, like Jerk.

So to prepare yourself you come up with a new system that allows you to use 5 letters instead of 4. For example: Troll.

This is the same problem IPv6 tries to solve. Every computer with a network connection has a number assigned to its network interface card. IPv4 utilizes a 32-bit numbering system that allows up to 294,967,296 addresses. IPv6 on the other hand uses a 128-bit number system that's the equivalent of what our national debt is going to be in a few years, which is approximately 340 undecillion.

There are a bunch of other efficiencies built into IPv6 as well like security and the elimination of network address translation. But the primary driver was the numbering issue.


Seriously? Why bother to post?
 

Covington

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Imagine this:

You're responsible for assigning names to 50 Android's. You decide it would be easiest if you standardized on 4 letter names. For example: Dick.

Not a big deal. There are plenty of 4 letter names right?

What you didn't realize is that some day the population of Android's would scale well beyond the original 50 and that you would eventually run out of 4 letter names, like Jerk.

So to prepare yourself you come up with a new system that allows you to use 5 letters instead of 4. For example: Troll.

This is the same problem IPv6 tries to solve. Every computer with a network connection has a number assigned to its network interface card. IPv4 utilizes a 32-bit numbering system that allows up to 294,967,296 addresses. IPv6 on the other hand uses a 128-bit number system that's the equivalent of what our national debt is going to be in a few years, which is approximately 340 undecillion.

There are a bunch of other efficiencies built into IPv6 as well like security and the elimination of network address translation. But the primary driver was the numbering issue.



Seriously? Why bother to post?



Good thing you posted this, because I just bet your right arm a giant fight was going to break out in this thread.
 
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ChevyNovaLN

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Imagine this:

You're responsible for assigning names to 50 Android's. You decide it would be easiest if you standardized on 4 letter names. For example: Dick.

Not a big deal. There are plenty of 4 letter names right?

What you didn't realize is that some day the population of Android's would scale well beyond the original 50 and that you would eventually run out of 4 letter names, like Jerk.

So to prepare yourself you come up with a new system that allows you to use 5 letters instead of 4. For example: Troll.

That just made my entire day. Not only was it helpful, it was funny as hell. :)

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk
 

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