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Laura Knotek

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I never used Lastpass. My password manager of choice is Enpass. However, my Enpass is also a paid version.
 
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B. Diddy

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I had already bought LastPass Premium before this. I like using it, so I think I'll stick with it.
 

Laura Knotek

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I already have premium, but what's the news? I haven't heard anything yet.
http://blog.lastpass.com/2021/02/changes-to-lastpass-free/
Free use will be limited to either computers or phones. Both types of devices cannot be used with free accounts.

I see no problem with that, since I've always been of the mindset that certain apps and software, such as password managers and VPNs, are only good if they are paid. I wouldn't trust something free for security.
 
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Mooncatt

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Thanks.

This obviously won't affect me since I'm already premium, but it wouldn't affect me personally as a free user anyway. When I was last on the free version, it was limited only to computer use, and mobile was only available if you paid for premium. You also may as well have written off tech support unless you went to their community forums. So it's almost like rolling back to what it use to be, only with the option of keeping mobile access if you want (by giving up pc access).
 

me just saying

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No reason to change. Been using LastPass for 10 years and paid for 9. I try to support the source when I can. As far as taking features away from the free version, I see nothing wrong with it and is still useable. You can have more than one free account with LastPass. Just get one for mobile and one for pc.
 

me just saying

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BitWarden - cross platform usable

I read about the LastPass change in several articles on several different tech sites and BitWarden was the number one recommendation in the comment sections. I tried this not too long ago to see what the fuss is about. Did not like the interface though it was easy to setup and easy to import LastPass database. Reminded me of an older version of LastPass.
 

stevenjb2020

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I like BitWarden due to it being Open Source Code, LastPass not sure.

Most of the features LastPass charges $3/month, I got with BitWarden for $10/year (less than $1/month).
 
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I don't disagree with paying for a password manager (I pay a monthly subscription for BlackBerry Password Keeper myself and I've been using it for almost 8 years) but the others I've tried have the same weakness anyway - they don't autocomplete passwords reliably on Android browsers. I've ended up using the browser (Firefox, Edge) for cross platform password management anyway, which is free and plenty secure enough, and everything else such as secure notes and app passwords goes to Password Keeper, which encrypts my data on my device and also on the backup to Google Drive.
 

me just saying

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I don't disagree with paying for a password manager (I pay a monthly subscription for BlackBerry Password Keeper myself and I've been using it for almost 8 years) but the others I've tried have the same weakness anyway - they don't autocomplete passwords reliably on Android browsers. I've ended up using the browser (Firefox, Edge) for cross platform password management anyway, which is free and plenty secure enough, and everything else such as secure notes and app passwords goes to Password Keeper, which encrypts my data on my device and also on the backup to Google Drive.

I use firefox password for when I don't want to open lastpass but I will only use it for forums and news sites. Nothing really important or security risk.
 

Jarfr

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"The development team has to pay their employees somehow, right? I'm sure they don't work for free."

So what have they been doing the +10 years it's been free? What suddenly changed?

It's an expensive pricing they suddenly demand.
Get someone used to your product for years, then change your policy and demand money from them. Same strategy that has been used by many merchants since damn of humanity, just like drug lords too.

Of course I'm switching, mainly because of principle. Not a morally acceptable approach to business.
 

Chuck Finley69

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"The development team has to pay their employees somehow, right? I'm sure they don't work for free."

So what have they been doing the +10 years it's been free? What suddenly changed?

It's an expensive pricing they suddenly demand.
Get someone used to your product for years, then change your policy and demand money from them. Same strategy that has been used by many merchants since damn of humanity, just like drug lords too.

Of course I'm switching, mainly because of principle. Not a morally acceptable approach to business.

Welcome to Android Central!!!!! Post early and post often.......

That being said, are you kidding me?!? How’s charging for a product immoral after giving a huge free trial period?
 

B. Diddy

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"The development team has to pay their employees somehow, right? I'm sure they don't work for free."

So what have they been doing the +10 years it's been free? What suddenly changed?

It's an expensive pricing they suddenly demand.
Get someone used to your product for years, then change your policy and demand money from them. Same strategy that has been used by many merchants since damn of humanity, just like drug lords too.

Of course I'm switching, mainly because of principle. Not a morally acceptable approach to business.

Welcome to Android Central! I disagree with what you're saying here. There are plenty of examples of services that started out free, and then started charging a fee for more premium options andor reducing the options that a free user can access (think of Google's recent move to end Google Photos's unlimited backups). It's also not much different from any service that charges a fee and then gradually raises it. Usually it's a business decision -- we have no direct insight into LastPass's business, but I'd say it's a pretty competitive space, and in order to retain good staff and continue to provide reliable (and most importantly secure) services, they may very well need to boost their revenue.

Mobile users need to get out of the habit of expecting everything for free. For security apps and services especially, you have to consider the implication of a free vs a paid service. Do you really want to rely on a company that provides security services completely free? Why would you trust them? What's in it for them? Personally, I'd be worried about a company like that trying to lure users with the promise of free services, only to have their data be sold or otherwise used for shady purposes (which is certainly one way they could monetize). This kind of issue is also important when using a VPN, since there are many "free" VPN services around that I wouldn't trust any farther than I could throw them.
 

stevenjb2020

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Welcome to Android Central! I disagree with what you're saying here. There are plenty of examples of services that started out free, and then started charging a fee for more premium options andor reducing the options that a free user can access (think of Google's recent move to end Google Photos's unlimited backups). It's also not much different from any service that charges a fee and then gradually raises it. Usually it's a business decision -- we have no direct insight into LastPass's business, but I'd say it's a pretty competitive space, and in order to retain good staff and continue to provide reliable (and most importantly secure) services, they may very well need to boost their revenue.

Mobile users need to get out of the habit of expecting everything for free. For security apps and services especially, you have to consider the implication of a free vs a paid service. Do you really want to rely on a company that provides security services completely free? Why would you trust them? What's in it for them? Personally, I'd be worried about a company like that trying to lure users with the promise of free services, only to have their data be sold or otherwise used for shady purposes (which is certainly one way they could monetize). This kind of issue is also important when using a VPN, since there are many "free" VPN services around that I wouldn't trust any farther than I could throw them.
What's in it for them, data collection
 

Shawn Soulo

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I stopped using LastPass, not because of the change in tier structure, but because the Android app became frustratingly inconsistent to use. It simply did not work predictably, no matter how many permissions or settings I enabled. If they improve their app, then perhaps I'll give them another try. But in the meantime, I have found more reliable options, which also happen to be cheaper.
 

ColoradoSteve

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I'll keep it. I've been paying for the premium service already.. I actually upgraded to the family play to give my kids access to the cross-platform functionality.

It's worth it for $4/month
 

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