New to smartphones, buying Moto G, need help with setup & SD card.

acejavelin

Well-known member
Jun 13, 2012
1,935
27
0
Visit site
I just noticed that I'm only getting 3G in my rural community with the Moto G. I used to get 4G with the iPhone 4s. Is this because the Moto is missing band 12? Kind of dissapointed. This is something I hadn't anticipated.
Did you have a carrier branded iPhone before? Is so, then this is kind of normal because your carrier was flat out lying to you and the Moto G properly reports it.

Let me explain, AT&T and T-mobile consider HSPA/HSPA+/LTE to be 4G and report it as 4G (and sometimes 4G-LTE) when it really isn't, but the Moto G uses the correct nomenclature of 3G for HSPA and H for HSPA+, and LTE for LTE, none of which is technically 4G, but we generally consider LTE to be "real" 4G.
 

Ry

Moderator Captain
Trusted Member
Nov 16, 2010
17,654
214
0
Visit site
Did you have a carrier branded iPhone before? Is so, then this is kind of normal because your carrier was flat out lying to you and the Moto G properly reports it.

Let me explain, AT&T and T-mobile consider HSPA/HSPA+/LTE to be 4G and report it as 4G (and sometimes 4G-LTE) when it really isn't, but the Moto G uses the correct nomenclature of 3G for HSPA and H for HSPA+, and LTE for LTE, none of which is technically 4G, but we generally consider LTE to be "real" 4G.

Aka fauxG.

Posted via the Android Central App
 

Ry

Moderator Captain
Trusted Member
Nov 16, 2010
17,654
214
0
Visit site
I just noticed that I'm only getting 3G in my rural community with the Moto G. I used to get 4G with the iPhone 4s. Is this because the Moto is missing band 12? Kind of dissapointed. This is something I hadn't anticipated.

Are you on T-Mobile?

Posted via the Android Central App
 

frozentundra1

Member
Feb 4, 2016
20
0
0
Visit site
Did you have a carrier branded iPhone before? Is so, then this is kind of normal because your carrier was flat out lying to you and the Moto G properly reports it.

Let me explain, AT&T and T-mobile consider HSPA/HSPA+/LTE to be 4G and report it as 4G (and sometimes 4G-LTE) when it really isn't, but the Moto G uses the correct nomenclature of 3G for HSPA and H for HSPA+, and LTE for LTE, none of which is technically 4G, but we generally consider LTE to be "real" 4G.

Thank you very much for the clarification. I have never been very into technology stuff and apparently just take things like that for granted.

It's amazing how much I've learned about the strange new world of hardware, software, operating systems, industries built around data collection, and more, just from trying to research, buy and use a new phone. I guess I've been living with my head in the sand for quite a long time now.

Are you on T-Mobile?

Posted via the Android Central App

No, I am using the at&t go phone service. They are the only carrier that seems to get any signal in my out-of-the-way backwoods area.

Rant mode: ON

I kind of hate the company(not that I have particular reason to believe their competitors are any better). I've had MANY strange service and account issues, some of which have never been completely resolved. Used to have to drive 125 miles round trip just to pay my bill. My Auto Pay used to malfunction every month. I'd lose service, try to pay over the phone, card would decline(any card I, my friends or family had), then I would drive all the way to the kiosk in the nearest big(ish) city and the same cards would work every single time. Months of this. On top of this, various landlines and non-at&t incoming callers would often receive an "account not in service" error message when trying to contact me. I could always call them though. It just so happened that my doctor, dentist and lawyer's office were all landlines that couldn't connect. Over a year of this. Mostly better now, no thanks to the million hours of talking to at&t employees, but every once and a while somebody still won't be able to get through to my account. I spent a ton of money and time battling these problems.

Rant over. :)
 

dpham00

Moderator Team VP
Moderator
Apr 23, 2011
30,108
200
63
Visit site
Thank you very much for the clarification. I have never been very into technology stuff and apparently just take things like that for granted.

It's amazing how much I've learned about the strange new world of hardware, software, operating systems, industries built around data collection, and more, just from trying to research, buy and use a new phone. I guess I've been living with my head in the sand for quite a long time now.



No, I am using the at&t go phone service. They are the only carrier that seems to get any signal in my out-of-the-way backwoods area.

Rant mode: ON

I kind of hate the company(not that I have particular reason to believe their competitors are any better). I've had MANY strange service and account issues, some of which have never been completely resolved. Used to have to drive 125 miles round trip just to pay my bill. My Auto Pay used to malfunction every month. I'd lose service, try to pay over the phone, card would decline(any card I, my friends or family had), then I would drive all the way to the kiosk in the nearest big(ish) city and the same cards would work every single time. Months of this. On top of this, various landlines and non-at&t incoming callers would often receive an "account not in service" error message when trying to contact me. I could always call them though. It just so happened that my doctor, dentist and lawyer's office were all landlines that couldn't connect. Over a year of this. Mostly better now, no thanks to the million hours of talking to at&t employees, but every once and a while somebody still won't be able to get through to my account. I spent a ton of money and time battling these problems.

Rant over. :)
Sorry to hear that. I am on Verizon, and my experience has been that anything but the most basic problems would be difficult for regular csr to fix. You can ask to talk to a supervisor or if that doesn't work, escalate to executive relations. Also, you can file complaints with the bbb and state ag. I find that executive relations and bbb/state ag will give you much more helpful and responsive service.
 

frozentundra1

Member
Feb 4, 2016
20
0
0
Visit site
Sorry to hear that. I am on Verizon, and my experience has been that anything but the most basic problems would be difficult for regular csr to fix. You can ask to talk to a supervisor or if that doesn't work, escalate to executive relations. Also, you can file complaints with the bbb and state ag. I find that executive relations and bbb/state ag will give you much more helpful and responsive service.

I agree with you completely. I've seldom had any success when calling 611 without having to go through the same flow-chart style question and answer session with CSR's that are trained to keep you on the flow-chart at all costs. Outside the box critical thinking seems to be quite discouraged. You have to be quite insistent in order to fight your way through that human-automation level to a superviser inside of 45 minutes to an hour, and possibly high-level management after that. I never thought to file a formal complaint with an oversight agency. I wish I had.

I had multiple "urgent cases" open with various "specialists" who were almost always on a call-back service. Occasionally, they would even call when they were supposed to.

In the end though, I don't think anybody from at&t ever really did anything to "fix" my issues. They were never even able to reassure me that they understood what the problems actually were. I just kept on with poor service and eventually the problems, for the most part, went away over the long run. What actually happened, I don't know, but I suspect it was something to do with the constant infrastructure growth of software and hardware that naturally happens over time.
 
Last edited:

dpham00

Moderator Team VP
Moderator
Apr 23, 2011
30,108
200
63
Visit site
I agree with you completely. I've seldom had any success when calling 611 without having to go through the same flow-chart style question and answer session with CSR's that are trained to keep you on the flow-chart at all costs. Outside the box critical thinking seems to be quite discouraged. You have to be quite insistent in order to fight your way through that human-automation level to a superviser inside of 45 minutes to an hour, and possibly high-level management after that. I never thought to file a formal complaint with an oversight agency. I wish I had.

I had multiple "urgent cases" open with various "specialists" who were almost always on a call-back service. Occasionally, they would even call when they were supposed to.

In the end though, I don't think anybody from at&t ever really did anything to "fix" my issues. They were never even able to reassure me that they understood what the problems actually were. I just kept on with poor service and eventually the problems, for the most part, went away over the long run. What actually happened, I don't know, but I suspect it was something to do with the constant infrastructure growth of software and hardware that naturally happens over time.

I would recommend that you try the methods above. For verizon when I sent an email to the ceo, it was forwarded to executive relations (sometimes called office of the president, or something similar). I was given a case agent and the direct number /extension of the agent. This is higher than the specialists or whatever. The case agent will deal with the necessary parties on your behalf. Although network issues are more tricky, but either way, you will get higher priority going through executive relations.

Also the key is to be very firm but polite and include all the facts.
 

Trending Posts

Forum statistics

Threads
945,961
Messages
6,928,071
Members
3,160,027
Latest member
Eninentola