Liquid Cooling: how does it work on S7?

jsiddle2025

Member
Jul 7, 2014
18
0
0
Visit site
can anyone with some scientific background explain how this pipe filled with water will cool the phone?
will it be effective?

I am knowledgeable on how liquid cooling loops work in a gaming PC, but with no reservoir or pump, how does this work?
 

Wizzy

Well-known member
Oct 30, 2011
239
0
16
Visit site
It's passive liquid cooling technology, as opposed to active systems in PCs that have more room and power for fans and radiators. It should be able to spread the heat better over the phone's surface area. Of course, the proof's in the pudding!

Posted via my LG G4
 

N4Newbie

Trusted Member
Nov 15, 2012
5,006
1
36
Visit site
It's passive liquid cooling technology, as opposed to active systems in PCs that have more room and power for fans and radiators. It should be able to spread the heat better over the phone's surface area. Of course, the proof's in the pudding!

Posted via my LG G4

I would like to see some evidence that it functions better (let's say, at least 10 - 15% better) than a simple copper heat sink of approximately the same dimensions and mass. Otherwise it's just hype.
 

LeoRex

Retired Moderator
Nov 21, 2012
6,223
0
0
Visit site
I would like to see some evidence that it functions better (let's say, at least 10 - 15% better) than a simple copper heat sink of approximately the same dimensions and mass. Otherwise it's just hype.

I wouldn't say its hype. That would be a lot of time, money and effort invested if that was the case. They've been talking about using systems like this for some time now. If wasn't more effective than a more simple copper heat sink, they'd just stick to the simpler heat sink.
 

N4Newbie

Trusted Member
Nov 15, 2012
5,006
1
36
Visit site
I wouldn't say its hype. That would be a lot of time, money and effort invested if that was the case. They've been talking about using systems like this for some time now. If wasn't more effective than a more simple copper heat sink, they'd just stick to the simpler heat sink.

You're right; I was just in a mood. :)

For the OP: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pipe
 
Last edited:

jschu22

Well-known member
Nov 8, 2009
565
7
0
Visit site
I wouldn't say its hype. That would be a lot of time, money and effort invested if that was the case. They've been talking about using systems like this for some time now. If wasn't more effective than a more simple copper heat sink, they'd just stick to the simpler heat sink.

Yeah, Samsung hasn't ever created and hyped up a new feature that ended up being discarded in subsequent devices...

Posted via the Android Central App
 

LeoRex

Retired Moderator
Nov 21, 2012
6,223
0
0
Visit site
Yeah, Samsung hasn't ever created and hyped up a new feature that ended up being discarded in subsequent devices.

Well, that happens quite often. But it's also a little different. Once a particular hardware feature, especially something something that has a significant impact on both the physical layout and thermal performance, makes it into production, it's there for a reason. And I'm glad to see it... I'd rather have a phone dissipate heat better than have it thermally throttled. The S6 registered the highest temperature of any phone on the market last year, hitting 120F under heavy load on a spot near the camera module. You take all that heat and thin it out, and you get the keep on the ol' go-pedal a lot longer before you have to lay off to keep things from getting too hot.
 

LeoRex

Retired Moderator
Nov 21, 2012
6,223
0
0
Visit site
The S6 was running on the Exynos chipset because the Qualcomm 810 was even hotter and turned out to be a total disaster for Qualcomm in the end.

Shame that the early press caused so many problems... my 6P has an 810 and I have zero heat issues nor any throttling headaches. But the S6 still ran hotter than the any of the early 810 phones, never mind the ones that came later in the year. Samsung must have recognized this and saw the need to do a more thorough job with thermal management next time around. These new processors may be more thermally efficient, but they aren't going to run any cooler.
 

DJCBS

Trusted Member
Sep 3, 2013
166
0
0
Visit site
can anyone with some scientific background explain how this pipe filled with water will cool the phone?
will it be effective?

This isn't really liquid cooling. Just like the Microsoft Lumia 950 doesn't have it either. These are heat pipes. Sony has been using them since the Z3+. They work fairly well, but it also depends a lot on the quality of the software optimization done to the chip.

If you want to see what these heat pipes are really like, this video of the L950 tears it apart.
https://youtu.be/snmG1QOOXXI?t=2m15s
 

Members online

Trending Posts

Forum statistics

Threads
941,300
Messages
6,907,866
Members
3,157,849
Latest member
Bule